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Science News

I Am a Catholic Priest Who Was Sexually Abused by a Pastor. Here’s How the Church Must Change

I Am a Catholic Priest Who Was Sexually Abused by a Pastor. Here’s How the Church Must ChangeFollowing yet another report about decades of widespread sexual abuse



08/17/2018 - 04:12 PM

 

Deadly, 40,000-foot fire tornado revealed in new videos

Deadly, 40,000-foot fire tornado revealed in new videosHarrowing new footage released by California's firefighting agency Cal Fire reveals the massive fire tornado that led to the death of a firefighter on July 26. The fire tornado was part of the Carr Fire that's engulfed 223,610 acres of land in Northern California so far. A report from Cal Fire breaks down the details surrounding the fiery phenomenon. SEE ALSO: A fire tornado hit California. Here's how it happened. Per the report, the tornado "was a large rotating fire plume that was roughly 1,000 feet in diameter at its base" and managed to reach a height of 40,000 feet.  In late July, we covered news of a fire tornado in the area on the evening of July 26. It's unclear whether the fire tornado in the report is the same as the one that garnered media attention at the time, according to Cal Fire.  "Observations from witnesses and other evidence suggest that either several fire tornados occurred at different locations and times, or one fire tornado formed and then periodically weakened and strengthened causing several separate damage areas," the report says. Fire tornados can happen when extreme heat spins up from the ground. As Mashable's Mark Kaufman explained at the time: Firefighters captured the disturbing video above from a helicopter, as well as footage taken from a fire engine, and from the Keswick Dam on the Sacramento River.  The Carr Fire continues to ravage parts of Shasta County and Trinity County. It is 77 percent contained, and other fires continue to rage in Northern California and other areas These fires are spurred on by extreme heat and dryness in the region. While human-caused climate change isn't necessarily the direct cause of any single weather event, like these fires, it can make extreme weather more likely now and in the future. WATCH: Scientists made an awesome error that could save our planet from plastic hell



08/18/2018 - 11:11 AM

 

A Chinese Plane Skidded off the Runway at Manila Airport During a Downpour

A Chinese Plane Skidded off the Runway at Manila Airport During a DownpourAll the passengers and crew were safe



08/17/2018 - 12:12 AM

 

2 Shot During High School Football Game in Florida

2 Shot During High School Football Game in FloridaAuthorities say both victims are hospitalized with one in critical condition



08/18/2018 - 09:22 AM

 

World's oldest cheese found - and could kill anyone if they try to eat it

World's oldest cheese found - and could kill anyone if they try to eat itScientists discover a 3,300-year-old cheese, thought to be the world's oldest, in Egypt, but it is riddled with bacteria.



08/17/2018 - 06:19 AM

 

More than 320 dead in India flood crisis

More than 320 dead in India flood crisisPressure intensified Saturday to save thousands still trapped by devastating floods that have killed more than 300 in the Indian state of Kerala, triggering landslides and sending torrents sweeping through villages in the region's worst inundation crisis in a century. Authorities warned of more torrential rain and strong winds over the weekend, as hundreds of troops and local fishermen staged desperate rescue attempts in helicopters and boats across the southern state. Kerala, popular among international tourists for its tropical hills and beaches, has been battered by record monsoon rainfall this year.



08/18/2018 - 02:31 AM

 

Putin Warns Merkel That Europe Can't Afford a New Syria Refugee Crisis

Putin Warns Merkel That Europe Can't Afford a New Syria Refugee CrisisMerkel was hosting Putin for their first bilateral talks in Germany since 2013



08/18/2018 - 02:50 PM

 

Seen from the air, the dry summer reveals an ancient harvest of archaeological finds

Seen from the air, the dry summer reveals an ancient harvest of archaeological findsA hot summer reveals hidden history beneath the dried-out fields - but only when seen from the air.



08/17/2018 - 05:49 AM

 

Judge told to consider protections for Montana grayling fish

Judge told to consider protections for Montana grayling fishHELENA, Mont. (AP) — An appeals court on Friday told a judge to take another look at whether a Montana fish should be protected, saying that U.S. wildlife officials did not consider all environmental factors when they decided against designating the Arctic grayling as a threatened or endangered species.



08/17/2018 - 07:54 PM

 

Spanish King Taunted by Catalan Separatists at Ceremony for Terror Attack Victims in Barcelona

Spanish King Taunted by Catalan Separatists at Ceremony for Terror Attack Victims in BarcelonaCatalonia's push to break away from Spain has been Felipe VI's biggest challenge



08/17/2018 - 09:27 AM

 

Don't worry, your cereal probably won't poison you with pesticides

Don't worry, your cereal probably won't poison you with pesticidesIt may seem like an alarmist local news story to declare your breakfast could kill you, but a new independent study claims that some of your favorite cereals could contain unsafe levels of a chemical used in a popular weed killer. The report, from the Environmental Working Group (EWG), was published online Wednesday and outlines the levels of the chemical glyphosate they found in various breakfast cereals and snacks.  Glyphosate is the major ingredient in the herbicide RoundUp and one at the center of an ongoing tug-of-war.   The World Health Organization (WHO) has ruled the chemical is "probably carcinogenic to humans," and the state of California has categorized it as a chemical linked to cancer. Meanwhile, in late 2017, the EPA concluded an assessment that declared "glyphosate is not likely to be carcinogenic to humans. And its with that intersection in mind that one has to look upon the new EWG report — which wasn't peer reviewed by independent scientists — with quite a bit of scrutiny. EWG versus the EPA For the study, the EWG tested dozens of samples, looking for levels of glyphosate that were above 160 pars per billion (ppb)/0.16 mg, which the organization considers the upper range of safe levels of the chemical for children to be exposed to. You can see their full results here but a few items stand out: Quaker Dinosaur Eggs, Brown Sugar, Instant Oatmeal had readings of 620 ppb/0.62 mg and 780 ppb/0.78 mg. Cheerios Toasted Whole Grain Oat Cereal had readings of 470 ppb/0.47 mg, 490 ppb/0.49 mg, and 530 ppb/0.53 mg. Quaker Old Fashioned Oats had readings of 390 ppb/0.39 mg, 1100 ppb/1.1 mg, and 1300 ppb/1.3 mg.  Those numbers seem not so great — if you use the EWG's threshold.  But the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets a much higher bar for how much glyphosate is safe for a person. According to a 1993 EPA report, the safe exposure level could be as high as 2 mg a day, well above any of the rates that the EWG uncovered in their studies.  For what it's worth, The Guardian recently published a report showing that the FDA has been investigating the use of glyphosate for years but has yet to issue any public findings.  The ongoing research into glyphosate is important because It's a hugely popular pesticide, with hundreds of millions of gallons being used on U.S. crops each year. And, per The Guardian's report, "the FDA has had trouble finding any food that does not carry traces of the pesticide."  Not that eating pesticides is a great thing, but the large discrepancies between the EPA numbers and the EWG numbers can be confusing for consumers trying to determine how much, exactly, is still safe. "Finding glyphosate in food is residue," Kaitlin Stack Whitney, an environmental studies scholar, said in an interview. "Residue limits are a subset of exposure limits as eating pesticides residue is one route of potential exposure." "So finding non-zero amounts isn't unexpected; it's's planned for and limited under current law," Stack Whitney, who also worked as a staff biologist for the EPA, added. There's also the issue of "spray drift," as Stack Whitney notes, pointing to EWG finding traces of the chemical on products labeled organic likely due to some of the pesticide drifting to those organic crops on the wind.  "The current pesticide review process struggles to account for this because agencies can't know what anyone and everyone's neighbors may grow and which chemicals they may apply," she said.  "So whether residues are from direct application or drift is critical to understanding how to address if you think the amount is unsafe." A question of methodology For Lori Hoepner, an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, it's about methodology.  She notes that "it's hard enough to have consensus among scientists when you're talking about using the same methods."  "So to go from something that would determine the limit of exposure, and try to extend that information to telling consumers about what it means to find glyphosate in their food, I think it can be perceived as something of a stretch," Hoepner said. Noting that she's familiar with the EWG's work and has vouched for them as a good resource for consumers, Hoepner still expressed some reservations about they way they presented their work for this study.  "It always concerns me when science is presented in a way that is not peer-reviewed, doesn't have the oversight of additional researchers who can validate or question the method." Stack Whitney echoed Hoepner's sentiment:  "[The EWG] study is like a white paper or other reports from think tanks, well researched and written but not peer reviewed. It would be useful to review their actual data and methods but those aren't available." Hoepner also wanted to see more about how they took their samples.  "What was their method? Was it randomized? Was it all from one box? How many different boxes were used? Where did they buy them?" Hoepner said. Noting the wide ranges in some of the results, Hoepner says, "that definitely creates a question mark in my mind for validity." The corporations defend their products As for the companies identified in the study, they're standing by the quality of their products.  A statement sent via email from the Quaker brand maintained the brand's stance they're products are perfectly safe and included a passage that denied the use of glyphosate in the making of their products. A spokesperson for General Mills, producers of Cheerios, echoed this sentiment in a statement. Corporate behemoth Monsanto, which produces RoundUp, has been under fire lately for the chemical, including a recent California verdict that ordered the company to pay $289 million to a school groundskeeper who claimed his constant and prolonged exposure to the chemical was to blame for him developing non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.  In the wake of the EWG's report, Monsanto posted a rebuttal on their website accusing the EWG of "publicizing misleading information." Additionally, in an email exchange, a spokesperson for Monsanto highlighted this portion: Additionally, Monsanto Vice President Scott Partridge told the New York Times in response to EWG study, “[The EWG] have an agenda. They are fear mongering. They distort science.” For consumers, there's no right or wrong answer at the moment. While buying different brands may seem like an option, the prevalence of the pesticides used makes it nearly impossible to completely avoid.  The opposing sets of data can only sow more confusion and consumers are left to decide who they trust more: groups like the EWG, government agencies like the EPA, or corporations.  WATCH: Here's how long fruits and vegetables are stored before you buy them at the store



08/17/2018 - 11:04 AM

 

Aretha Franklin: A master in the art of making an entrance: Part 6

Aretha Franklin: A master in the art of making an entrance: Part 6Franklin paid tribute to Carole King with a performance at the 2015 Kennedy Center Honors.



08/16/2018 - 11:23 PM

 

NASA just found a Muppet on Mars, and Yoshi is there, too

NASA just found a Muppet on Mars, and Yoshi is there, too

NASA has been poking around the dust and rock on Mars for some time now, and as far as we know there's nothing to indicate that any living organisms currently inhabit the Red Planet. There is, however, a muppet.

In a new batch of images snapped by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter there appears to be something lurking on the planet's surface. It's not an alien ship or some sort of sci-fi space monster. No, it's actually a clumsy lab assistant made out of fluffy fabric, and his name is Beaker.

Mars has yielded all kinds of optical illusions in the past, with casual observers thinking they've seen everything from a manmade cannonball to a crashed alien ship. None of these things are actually what they seem, and the same is obviously true this time around, but it's impossible to deny the likeness.

https://twitter.com/HiRISE/status/1029021906282799105

I mean, just look at it. That's definitely Beaker.

Back in reality, what we're actually looking at is bulbous formations of frozen carbon dioxide which have amassed at the planet's pole. These massive frozen glaciers give the landscape a very alien appearance, and it's easy to start seeing things that aren't really there. In fact, several Twitter users have chimed in with their own interpretations.

Here we have Scrooge McDuck:

https://twitter.com/MischaDakar/status/1030044603808927744

Yoshi:

https://twitter.com/Monirah_A_M/status/1030245175501574144

And even the Cookie Monster lurking just below our friend Beaker:

https://twitter.com/Methinkso/status/1030159986452656128

Who knew Mars was such a popular place?

NASA is used to people thinking they see things on Mars that aren't actually there. In their tweet, they refer to it as the phenomenon known as pareidolia, which is the habit of people to assign meaning and value to vague shapes that aren't necessarily what they appear to be.

The most famous example of this is of course the "Face on Mars," which is a rocky formation which, under the perfect lighting conditions, takes on some of the features of a human face. The first grainy image of the face was taken by NASA's Viking, and just happened to show the "face" in the perfect light. Subsequent images from newer technology revealed the feature to be far less humanoid.



08/17/2018 - 11:49 AM

 

Admiral Who Led Bin Laden Raid Tells President Trump to Revoke His Security Clearance, Too

Admiral Who Led Bin Laden Raid Tells President Trump to Revoke His Security Clearance, TooThirteen former intelligence chiefs – including David Petraeus Robert Gates – released a statement backing Brennan and calling Trump's attacks "ill-considered and unprecedented"



08/17/2018 - 08:24 AM

 

‘The Laws Need to Change’ After Shocking Reports of Child Abuse by Catholic Priests, Pennsylvania Attorney General Says

‘The Laws Need to Change’ After Shocking Reports of Child Abuse by Catholic Priests, Pennsylvania Attorney General Says"I don’t know how any lawmaker in Pennsylvania could possibly be against those reforms"



08/16/2018 - 08:57 PM

 

A Mysterious Furry 'Sea Monster' Has Washed Up on a Russian Beach

A Mysterious Furry 'Sea Monster' Has Washed Up on a Russian BeachA huge creature washed up on a beach in Russia and nobody is really sure what it is.



08/17/2018 - 12:28 PM

 

We have some bad news about the future of the terrible wildfires in the Western U.S.

We have some bad news about the future of the terrible wildfires in the Western U.S.The flames scorching the Western U.S. aren't expected to relent anytime soon.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) gave its monthly U.S. climate report on Thursday, and they used the opportunity to show that the next couple of months are ripe for an enhanced fire risk out West. SEE ALSO: The baking Pacific Ocean is changing the weather on the Southern California coast After noting the exceptionally hot and dry conditions that stoked destructive wildfires so far this summer, Tim Brown, director of the Western Regional Climate Center, said in a press call that it won't be until after October that "we see a decline in significant fire potential." A critical driver of this heightened fire potential is that trees, grasses, and shrubs, known collectively as fuels, are currently "flirting with all-time record lows for fuel moisture," said Brown. Visible imagery from NOAA's #GOES16, along with its fire radiative power product, shows the explosive growth of #wildfires — ignited by #lightning strikes over the weekend — in #WashingtonState, including the #GrassValleyFire. pic.twitter.com/4hyxpVGR1J — NOAA Satellites PA (@NOAASatellitePA) August 13, 2018 In short, hot temperatures and multiple heat waves this summer have parched the land to extreme levels, turning it to tinder. Meaningful rains can solve the problem, but they don't usually show up in many portions of the West until November.  What's more, the coming fall months have another potent fire factor that isn't usually seen in August: Strong offshore winds, blowing from the northeast.  Called "diablo winds" in Northern California, these gusts are hot, dry, and fast and have historically whipped up fires. Case in point: The deadly firestorms that swept through Northern California neighborhoods last fall were stoked by October's diablo winds. The smoke from the western North America #wildfires is moving eastward across the Atlantic Ocean, captured here by our #GOESEast satellite. More imagery: https://t.co/P1F11zXUHI pic.twitter.com/HsJh25vbvY — NOAA Satellites (@NOAASatellites) August 14, 2018 On top of all this, Brown underscored that since 1895, there has been a trend in increasing temperatures at night, which ultimately won't allow fuels to cool off and recover.  "This can lead to longer fires and more smoke production," he said. But in the last couple decades, "this trend has taken off," said Brown.  Taken alone, each of these environmental conditions can stoke fires, but taken together, they invite major flames.  Some of the largest fires in California history are burning through the ravaged state right now, and smoke from both the Western U.S. and Canada has traveled thousands of miles away to the Atlantic Ocean, actually engulfing a cyclone.  Just out: NASA global temperature for July. It was the 3rd warmest July on record after 2016 and 2017. Since July is the warmest month of the year, the past July was one of the warmest recorded months ever. Likely among the warmest months since the Eemian 120,000 years ago. pic.twitter.com/KGZXh5ZXOS — Stefan Rahmstorf (@rahmstorf) August 15, 2018 Brown likened the profoundly parched vegetation in the West to a dying Christmas tree.  During winter, the tree might be wet and green, but as time passes and the leaves brown, it becomes an increasing flammable object. And unfortunately, that's how we all should be thinking about the West right now. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?



08/17/2018 - 05:00 AM

 

Murdered Colorado Mother Called Husband 'the Best Dad Us Girls Could Ask For' in Facebook Posts

Murdered Colorado Mother Called Husband 'the Best Dad Us Girls Could Ask For' in Facebook PostsHer husband Christopher is accused of killing her and their two daughters



08/17/2018 - 07:29 AM

 

Vietnam's caged bears dying off as bile prices plummet

Vietnam's caged bears dying off as bile prices plummetTwo moon bears are gently removed from the cramped cages where they have been held for 13 years, rescuers carefully checking their rotten teeth and matted paws before sending them to their new home in a grassy sanctuary in northern Vietnam. The animals are among the lucky few to be rescued in a country where hundreds of bears are feared to have been killed or starved to death as the cost of once-valuable farmed bile has plummeted. Bear bile is extracted -- often continuously and painfully -- from the animals' gallbladders and used in traditional medicine in Vietnam, where the illegal practice remains widespread.



08/17/2018 - 02:37 AM

 

Forget curing cancer: Scientists have discovered the perfect way to break spaghetti

Forget curing cancer: Scientists have discovered the perfect way to break spaghetti

With all the incredible medical and technological advancements coming out of the scientific community these days you might not think that researchers would be spending time studying spaghetti, but you'd be wrong. In a new paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, MIT scientists explain how to correctly break strands of the stringy pasta in half.

If you've ever made spaghetti you'll be very familiar with this particular problem: Dry spaghetti strands don't fit perfectly in most stovetop pots. You can either drop them in at full length and let them hang over the edge as the bottom half goes soft to snap them in half, in which case you'll end up with a bunch of smaller pasta chunks and a metric ton of tiny spaghetti fragments that aren't good for much of anything.

Not wanting to pass up the opportunity to solve a problem, a duo of MIT researchers decided to test the mechanics that leads to dry spaghetti strands busting up into a million tiny chunks rather than two uniform halves. What they discovered is an issue that plagues many long, thin objects, and they've even come up with a solution.

"A well-known problem with direct implications for the fracture behavior of elongated brittle objects, such as vaulting poles or long fibers, goes back to the famous physicist Richard Feynman who observed that dry spaghetti almost always breaks into three or more pieces when exposed to large bending stresses," the researchers write.

The fix? Add a twist to the pasta as you bend it. A twisting motion of approximately 270 degrees seems to be the sweet spot. This helps to control the stress on the object and results in a much cleaner split. "Our experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that twisting enables remarkable fracture control by using the different propagation speeds of twist and bending waves," the team explains.

This all might sound a little silly, but the research has implications far beyond your dinner plate. The neat thing about experiments like this is that the knowledge gained can be used for other applications, and the results of the experiments can now be used as a foundation for better understanding the fracturing habits of other, slightly more important objects than spaghetti.



08/16/2018 - 09:01 PM

 

Former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan Dies at Age 80

Former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan Dies at Age 80Kofi Annan, one of the world's most celebrated diplomats and a charismatic symbol of the United Nations has died



08/18/2018 - 06:12 AM

 

New panda mom doesn't know she has twins thanks to these sneaky zookeepers

New panda mom doesn't know she has twins thanks to these sneaky zookeepersCrafty zookeepers are keeping a set of newborn panda twins alive by switching them out every day.  Although twins aren't uncommon, when pandas have multiple babies they tend to devote all of their attention to only one of their cubs, leaving the other to starve.  SEE ALSO: Someone tried to smuggle a snake onto a plane by hiding it in a hard drive But these zookeepers have managed to get new panda moms to care for both babies by rotating them out, tricking the pandas into believing they only have one cub to care for. A BBC Earth video — narrated by the one and only David Attenborough — shows the keepers' technique.  New mother Lee Lee hasn't realized that she had twins because her keepers have been switching her 18-day-old cubs out, so she only has one at a time.  When they need to change out the cubs, they distract Lee Lee with a bowl of honey water and worm the young cub from her paws. Then, they put that cub in an incubator and bring the other cub to Lee Lee, ensuring that both get the maternal care they need.  Keepers swap the cubs out at least 10 times a day, keeping a meticulous record of the babies' time with their mom.  The technique has an almost 100 percent survival rate. Although pandas are no longer endangered, they are still vulnerable, so finding new ways to help the species along, even in captivity, is important. Plus, it's freaking adorable. WATCH: This design studio is growing gourds inside 3D printed molds to create organic, biodegradable cups



08/18/2018 - 01:16 PM

 

Judge in Manafort Trial Says He Won't Identify Jurors After Receiving Threats

Judge in Manafort Trial Says He Won't Identify Jurors After Receiving ThreatsJury lists are made public unless a judge gives a reason for them to be a secret



08/17/2018 - 02:48 PM

 

Trump Administration Ends $200 Million in Funding for Syria Stabilization Programs

Trump Administration Ends $200 Million in Funding for Syria Stabilization ProgramsThe Trump administration is notifying Congress Friday, officials say



08/17/2018 - 10:36 AM

 

Elephants take the flag in Indonesia independence ceremony

Elephants take the flag in Indonesia independence ceremonyA trio of rare elephants led an unusual ceremony in the Sumatran jungle Friday, raising Indonesia's red and white flag to help mark the country's independence day. Brandishing a flagpole flying the national colours by the trunk, lead elephant Ulu marched outside a conservation office in northern Aceh province as onlookers sung the national anthem. “As we can see here, this is also an education for us, that elephants can live side by side with humans," Rizal, an elephant trainer at the conservation office, told AFP.



08/18/2018 - 01:41 PM

 

Edited Transcript of S63.SI earnings conference call or presentation 8-Aug-18 3:00am GMT

Edited Transcript of S63.SI earnings conference call or presentation 8-Aug-18 3:00am GMTHalf Year 2018 Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd Results Briefing



08/17/2018 - 09:55 PM

 

China Takes Action Against 40 Officials in Widening Vaccine Scandal Fallout

China Takes Action Against 40 Officials in Widening Vaccine Scandal FalloutThe scandal rattled the country’s $120 billion vaccine industry



08/16/2018 - 10:56 PM

 

Maths: six ways to help your child love it

Maths: six ways to help your child love itMake maths more fun with these tips



08/17/2018 - 08:20 AM

 

Tesla's Board Is Reportedly Searching for a Second-in-Command to Help Elon Musk

Tesla's Board Is Reportedly Searching for a Second-in-Command to Help Elon MuskAfter Musk's controversial tweet could cost the company dearly



08/17/2018 - 10:06 AM

 

NASA finally figured out what this ‘foreign object’ on Mars actually is

NASA finally figured out what this ‘foreign object’ on Mars actually is

Despite what so many people would love to believe, NASA hasn't discovered any evidence of past or present intelligent life on Mars. So, when the Curiosity rover stumbled upon what appeared to be a very suspicious chunk of something on the Red Planet's surface, they were not only surprised but also a little bit worried.

The thin fragment was suspicious enough to warrant its own name, with NASA's Curiosity rover team calling it the "Pettegrove Point Foreign Object Debris," named for the location where it was discovered. With no idea what it was or where it came from, the rover's handlers began to worry that it might actually be a chunk of the rover itself, suggesting some unseen damage or other issue with the robot. Thankfully, those concerns seem to have been unfounded.

In a new update from NASA the object has now been identified as a natural chunk of rock rather than a piece of any manmade craft or vehicle. The team analyzed the bizarre object with a tool called the ChemCam RMI. The instrument uses a laser to sniff out the makeup of anything it's pointed at, and the results for this particular piece of debris revealed that it's actually just a very thin piece of rock.

NASA describes the inspection thusly:

The planning day began with an interesting result from the previous plan's ChemCam RMI analysis of a target that was referred to as "Pettegrove Point Foreign Object Debris" (PPFOD), and speculated to be a piece of spacecraft debris. In fact it was found to be a very thin flake of rock, so we can all rest easy tonight - Curiosity has not begun to shed its skin!

How this particularly thin sliver of rock got to where it is — and why it seems to be a different color than the surrounding sand and debris — remains unexplained, but at least the rover isn't falling apart.



08/17/2018 - 01:21 PM

 

India Announces Plans for Manned Space Flights

India Announces Plans for Manned Space FlightsIndia is a country carrying increasing expectations. Now, as its influence has expanded in several industrial sectors, the government has emphasized that the country's ambitions transcend this world and aim toward the heavens. Addressing the nation during the Aug. 15 celebrations for India's independence from the United Kingdom, Prime Minister Narendra Modi discussed the country's plans to have one astronaut in space by 2022 as part of Gaganyaan, India's ambitious human space flight plan.



08/17/2018 - 01:27 PM

 

President Trump Is Interested in a Major Shakeup for Corporate Earnings Reports

President Trump Is Interested in a Major Shakeup for Corporate Earnings ReportsThe shift could promote longer-term thinking among business leaders



08/17/2018 - 09:59 AM

 

Could an Australian bee solve the world's plastic crisis? 

Could an Australian bee solve the world's plastic crisis? Researchers believe an Australian bee which produces a “cellophane-like” material for its nests could help to end the world’s reliance on disposable plastics. The native Hylaeus nubilosus masked bee, known for the distinctive yellow badge on its back, does not sting or live in hives but it has generated interest because of the nesting material it produces, which is non-toxic, waterproof, flame-resistant and able to withstand heat. A biotech company in New Zealand, Humble Bee, is trying to reverse-engineer the material in the hope of mass producing it as an alternative to plastic. Veronica Harwood-Stevenson, the firm’s founder,  said she began investigating the potential plastic alternative after noticing a throwaway line in a research paper about the “cellophane-like” qualities of the masked bee’s nesting material. "Plastic particles and chemicals have permeated ecosystems and organisms around the world, [from] foetal blood of babies [to] the most remote arctic lakes; it's so pervasive, it's terrifying," she told The Sydney Morning Herald. "It's about biomimicry, about copying what's in the natural environment, and we've been doing it in design for centuries, from plane wing design inspired by birds of prey to train shapes reflecting bird beaks." Richard Furneaux, a chemistry professor  at the Victoria University of Wellington, said the discovery of the new material was “almost too good to be true”. File image of bees working on their hive “Its robustness is beyond what you would have expected,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Scientists analysed the genetic makeup of the bioplastic by studying the bee’s glands. Humble Bee plans to initially use the material to make outdoor apparel, such as camping gear, which often use toxic chemicals to keep them waterproof. "Outdoor apparel is definitely what we’re most interested in because of the chemicals being used and because chances are, if you like the environment, you don't want the products you enjoy to be screwing up the environment,"  Ms Harwood-Stevenson said. Scientists believe chemicals used to change the properties of plastic – such as those that make it harder or waterproof – may be harmful and could increase the risk of heart disease, cancer or infertility. The bioplastic could also be used for aviation, electrics and construction products. It is resistant to acid which could allow it to coat medicines and help them to pass through the stomach. The firm hopes to start selling the bioplastic in five years.



08/18/2018 - 12:46 PM

 

Former Indian Prime Minister Vajpayee, Who Sparked Both a Nuclear Arms Race and a Peace Process, Has Died at 93

Former Indian Prime Minister Vajpayee, Who Sparked Both a Nuclear Arms Race and a Peace Process, Has Died at 93Vajpayee set off India's nuclear race but later reached out to Pakistan in peace



08/16/2018 - 09:51 PM

 

New Horrifying Details Released About Fire Tornado That Killed California Firefighter

New Horrifying Details Released About Fire Tornado That Killed California FirefighterThe fire tornado shot glass into one of the firefighter's eyes



08/16/2018 - 09:20 PM

 

Elon Musk Says Stress and Long Hours Are Taking a Toll During an 'Excruciating' Year

Elon Musk Says Stress and Long Hours Are Taking a Toll During an 'Excruciating' YearBut he stood by a recent tweet saying he might take Tesla private



08/17/2018 - 02:32 AM

 

Aretha Franklin, 'Queen of Soul,' dies at 76 : Part 1

Aretha Franklin, 'Queen of Soul,' dies at 76 : Part 1The music icon was just 25 years old when she came out with her first hit "Respect" and her music career lasted more than 50 years.



08/16/2018 - 11:17 PM

 

 

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