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Science News

Turkey's Erdogan Says Saudi Arabian Officials Planned Jamal Khashoggi's Murder Days Before His Death

Turkey's Erdogan Says Saudi Arabian Officials Planned Jamal Khashoggi's Murder Days Before His DeathAs skepticism intensifies about Saudi Arabia's account of Jamal Khashoggi's death



10/23/2018 - 06:08 AM

 

World's oldest intact shipwreck found in Black Sea

World's oldest intact shipwreck found in Black SeaAn ancient Greek trading ship dating back more than 2,400 years has been found virtually intact at the bottom of the Black Sea, the world's oldest known shipwreck, researchers said on Tuesday. The vessel is one of more than 60 shipwrecks identified by the Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project including Roman ships and a 17th-century Cossack raiding fleet. During the three-year project, researchers used specialist remote deep-water camera systems previously used in offshore oil and gas exploration to map the sea floor.



10/23/2018 - 07:16 AM

 

Young climate activists say their lawsuit should go to trial

Young climate activists say their lawsuit should go to trialSEATTLE (AP) — Young activists who are suing the U.S. government in a high-profile climate change lawsuit say the case poses important constitutional questions that should be fully evaluated at trial next week.



10/22/2018 - 08:03 PM

 

President Trump Admits He Has 'No Proof' Terrorists Are in the Migrant Caravan

President Trump Admits He Has 'No Proof' Terrorists Are in the Migrant CaravanPresident Donald Trump conceded there’s no evidence for his claim that Middle Eastern terrorists are among thousands of migrants traveling from Honduras toward the U.S. border.



10/23/2018 - 06:48 PM

 

Indian court eases firecracker ban even as pollution soars

Indian court eases firecracker ban even as pollution soarsIndia's top court on Tuesday eased a ban on fireworks for a major Hindu festival despite air pollution in New Delhi and other cities again reaching danger levels. The Supreme Court, which last year banned firecrackers for the Diwali festival, rejected a new call for a ban in the capital amid growing concern over pollution. Firecrackers set off for the Hindu festival of lights add to the toxic mix created by farmers burning crop stubble, diesel engines, coal-fired power plants and industrial emissions.



10/23/2018 - 04:30 AM

 

China Officially Launched the World's Longest Sea Bridge Linking Hong Kong and Macau to the Mainland

China Officially Launched the World's Longest Sea Bridge Linking Hong Kong and Macau to the MainlandThe 34-mile mega-bridge connects Hong Kong, Zhuhai and Macau



10/23/2018 - 03:32 AM

 

STEM jobs pay more, but how much and for how long?

STEM jobs pay more, but how much and for how long?STEM jobs pay a lot more, but only for a while.



10/23/2018 - 10:25 AM

 

Medtronic co-founder who created wearable pacemaker dies

Medtronic co-founder who created wearable pacemaker diesMINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Earl Bakken, an electronics repairman who created the first wearable external pacemaker and co-founded one of the world's largest medical device companies, Medtronic, has died. He was 94.



10/22/2018 - 12:19 PM

 

Complete list of every full moon in 2018, including October's Hunter's Moon

Complete list of every full moon in 2018, including October's Hunter's MoonStargazers should keep their eyes on the skies for 17:45 on October 24, which is when October's full moon - dubbed the Hunter's moon - will peak. The first blue moon of the year was a spectacular sight, dubbed the 'super blue blood moon'. Falling on January 31, it was the product of three different phenomena: it was a supermoon, a blue moon and a blood moon. While many said it was the first to be seen in 152 years, other contested the fact, leading to a division among scientists. Stargazers were also treated to two full moons in March: as well as the first full moon on the night of March 1, we saw another full moon on March 31. As it was the second full moon of the month, it was a blue moon – the second of 2018. July saw the longest total eclipse of the 21st century, lasting from 8.49pm to 10.13pm in London. Making the phenomenon even more spectacular, Mars was at its closest point to Earth since 2003, meaning the Red Planet was close to maximum brightness.  As if that was not enough, sky-watchers were also able to see Jupiter in the south-west and had a chance of catching the International Space Station (ISS) sailing overhead. The blood moon: a rare lunar eclipse, in pictures The moon is the largest and brightest object in our night sky and has enchanted and inspired mankind for centuries. Blue moons are a rare breed, but full moons can be admired every month. Here is everything you need to know about Earth's only natural satellite, from all its different names to how it was formed. How often does a full moon occur? A full moon occurs every 29.5 days and is when the Moon is completely illuminated by the Sun's rays. It occurs when Earth is directly aligned between the Sun and the Moon.  Why do full moons have names? The early Native Americans didn't record time using months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Instead tribes gave each full moon a nickname to keep track of the seasons and lunar months. Most of the names relate to an activity or an event that took place at the time in each location. However, it wasn't a uniform system and tribes tended to name and count moons differently. Some, for example, counted four seasons a year while others counted five. Others defined a year as 12 moons, while others said there were 13. Colonial Americans adopted some of the moon names and applied them to their own calendar system which is why they're still in existence today, according to the Farmer’s Almanac. January: Wolf Moon This moon was named because villagers used to hear packs of wolves howling in hunger around this time of the year. Its other name is the Old Moon. This January there are two Wolf Moons - and stargazers will be in for a treat as both will be supermoons. When two moons occur in one month, the second is called a blue moon. While blue moons typically occur only once every two to three years, this year we will be treated to two moons - the second appearing at the end of March. The night following the first full moon of the month saw the Quadrantid meteor shower light up the skies. When? January 2 and January 31 February: Snow Moon Snow moon is named after the white stuff because historically it's always been the snowiest month in America. It's also traditionally referred to as the Hunger Moon, because hunting was very difficult in snowy conditions.  However this year there won't be a Snow Moon - with a full moon occurring at the end of January and another at the beginning of March, we won't see one light up the skies during the year's shortest month. When? There will be no full moon this month March: Worm Moon As temperatures warm, earthworm casts begin to appear and birds begin finding food. It's also known as Sap Moon, Crow Moon and Lenten Moon. There will be two moons this March, one at the start of the month and one at the end. As in January, the second moon of the month is called a blue moon. The second moon of the month is important because it is used to fix the date of Easter, which is always the Sunday after the first full moon following the spring equinox. This year, that moon appears on Saturday March 31, which means Easter Sunday falls the day after, on April 1. When? March 1 and 31 April: Pink Moon April's full moon is known as the Pink Moon, but don't be fooled into thinking it will turn pink. It's actually named after pink wildflowers, which appear in the US and Canada in early spring.  This moon is also known as Egg Moon, due to spring egg-laying season. Some coastal tribes referred to it as Fish Moon because it appeared at the same time as the shad swimming upstream.  When? April 30 May: Flower Moon Spring has officially sprung by the time May arrives, and flowers and colourful blooms dot the landscape. This moon is also known as Corn Planting Moon, as crops are sown in time for harvest, or Bright Moon because this full moon is known to be one of the brightest. Some people refer to it as Milk Moon. When? May 29 Night sky June: Strawberry Moon This moon is named after the beginning of the strawberry picking season. It's other names are Rose Moon, Hot Moon, or Hay Moon as hay is typically harvested around now. This moon appears in the same month as the summer solstice, the longest day of the year (June 21) in which we can enjoy approximately 17 hours of daylight. When? June 28 July: Thunder Moon Named due to the prevalence of summer thunder storms. It's sometimes referred to as the Full Buck Moon because at this time of the year a buck's antlers are fully grown.  When? July 27 August: Sturgeon Moon Tribes in North America typically caught Sturgeon during this month, but also it is when grain and corn were gathered so is also referred to as Grain Moon.  This moon appears in the same month as the Perseid meteor shower, which peaked on August 12. When? August 26 Perseids meteor shower 2018 - in pictures September: Harvest Moon The Harvest Moon is the name given to the first full moon that takes place closest to the Autumn equinox, which this year will come on September 25. The Harvest Moon arrived late last year, on October 5 - it normally rises in September. It was during September that most of the crops were harvested ahead of the autumn and this moon would give light to farmers so they could carry on working longer in the evening. Some tribes also called it the Barley Moon, the Full Corn Moon or Fruit Moon.  When?September 25 October: Hunter's Moon As people planned ahead for the cold months ahead, the October moon came to signify the ideal time for hunting game, which were becoming fatter from eating falling grains. This moon is also known as the travel moon and the dying grass moon. When? October 24 at 17:45 BST November: Frost Moon The first of the winter frosts historically begin to take their toll around now and winter begins to bite, leading to this month's moon moniker. It is also known as the Beaver Moon. When? November 23 December: Cold Moon Nights are long and dark and winter's grip tightens, hence this Moon's name. With Christmas just a few weeks away, it's also referred to as Moon before Yule and Long Nights Moon. When? December 22 Once in a blue moon Does this well-known phrase have anything to do with the moon? Well, yes it does. We use it to refer to something happening very rarely and a blue moon is a rare occurrence. It's the name given to a second full moon that occurs in a single calendar month and this typically occurs only once every two to three years. There's lots of other moons, too: Full moon: We all know what these are. They come around every month and light up the night at night. Harvest moon: The full moon closest to the autumn equinox. Black moon: Most experts agree that this refers to the second new moon in a calendar month. The last black moon was at the start of October 2016 and the next one is expected in 2019. Blue moon: A phenomenon that occurs when there is a second full moon in one calendar month. Joe Rao from space.com explains: "A second full moon in a single calendar month is sometimes called a blue moon. A black moon is supposedly the flip side of a blue moon; the second new moon in a single calendar month." The infrequent nature of this lunar event led to the phrase "once in a blue moon" to signify a rare occurrence. It does not actually mean the moon will be blue. Blood moon: Also known as a supermoon lunar eclipse. It's when the shadow of Earth casts a reddish glow on the moon, the result of a rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year.  There was one in the UK in September 2015, and before that in 1982 but the next one won't be until 2033.  Strawberry moon: A rare event when there's a full moon on the same day as the summer solstice. It happened in June 2016 for the first time since 1967 when 17 hours of sunlight gave way to a bright moonlit sky. Despite the name, the moon does appear pink or red. The romantic label was coined by the Algonquin tribes of North America who believed June’s full moon signalled the beginning of the strawberry picking season. What is a supermoon? Ever looked up at the night sky to see a full moon so close you could almost touch it? Well you've probably spotted a supermoon. The impressive sight happens when a full moon is at the point in its orbit that brings it closest to Earth. To us Earth-lings, it appears 30 per cent brighter and 14 per cent bigger to the naked eye.  How a supermoon is generated Supermoon is not an astrological term though. It's scientific name is actually Perigee Full Moon, but supermoon is more catchy and is used by the media to describe our celestial neighbour when it gets up close. Astrologer Richard Nolle first came up with the term supermoon and he defined it as "… a new or full moon which occurs with the moon at or near (within 90 per cent of) its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit", according to earthsky.org. How many supermoons are there in 2018? There are two full moon supermoons this year, both of which took place in the first month of the year. The first appeared on January 2 and the second appeared on January 31. As it was the second moon of the month, the latter moon was also known as a blue moon. There will also be two new moon supermoons in 2018: one on July 13 and another on August 11. Unfortunately, stargazers were unable to see these moons as new moons are generally obscured by the light of the sun. Last year we were lucky enough to have four supermoons. The first three - April 26, May 25, June 24 - were new moons.  The fourth supermoon of 2017 appeared on December 3 and was a full moon supermoon. This will be a full moon supermoon. In fact, it's the first of three full moon supermoons in a row.  Supermoon rises over Auckland, New Zealand in August 2014. Credit: Simon Runting/REX What do I look for? Head outside at sunset when the moon is closest to the horizon and marvel at its size. As well as being closer and brighter, the moon (clouds permitting) should also look orange and red in colour. Why? Well, as moonlight passes through the thicker section of the atmosphere, light particles at the red end of the spectrum don't scatter as easily as light at the blue end of the spectrum. So when the moon looks red, you're just looking at red light that wasn't scattered. As the moon gets higher in the sky, it returns to its normal white/yellow colour.  Will the tides be larger? Yes. When full or new moons are especially close to Earth, it leads to higher tides. Tides are governed by the gravitational pull of the moon and, to a lesser extent, the sun. Because the sun and moon go through different alignments, this affects the size of the tides. Tell me more about the moon The moon is 4.6 billion years old and was formed between 30-50 million years after the solar system. It is smaller than Earth - about the same size as Pluto in fact. Its surface area is less than the surface area of Asia - about 14.6 million square miles according to space.com Gravity on the moon is only 1/6 of that found on Earth. The moon is not round, but is egg-shaped with the large end pointed towards Earth. It would take 135 days to drive by car to the moon at 70 mph (or nine years to walk). The moon has "moonquakes" caused by the gravitational pull of Earth. Experts believe the moon has a molten core, just like Earth.  How was the Moon formed? How the Moon was formed Man on the Moon Only 12 people have ever walked on the moon and they were all American men, including (most famously) Neil Armstrong who was the first in 1969 on the Apollo II mission.  The last time mankind sent someone to the moon was in 1972 when Gene Cernan visited on the Apollo 17 mission. Although Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, Buzz Aldrin was the first man to urinate there. While millions watched the moon landing on live television, Aldrin was forced to go in a tube fitted inside his space suit. Buzz Aldrin Jr. beside the U.S. flag after man reaches the Moon for the first time during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969.  Credit: AP When the astronauts took off their helmets after their moonwalk, they noticed a strong smell, which Armstrong described as “wet ashes in a fireplace” and Aldrin as “spent gunpowder”. It was the smell of moon-dust brought in on their boots. The mineral, armalcolite, discovered during the first moon landing and later found at various locations on Earth, was named after the three Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil ARMstrong, Buzz ALdrin and Michael COLlins. An estimated 600 million people watched the Apollo 11 landing live on television, a world record until 750 million people watched the wedding of the Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. One of President Nixon’s speechwriters had prepared an address entitled: “In Event of Moon Disaster”. It began: “Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay to rest in peace.” If the launch from the Moon had failed, Houston was to close down communications and leave Armstrong and Aldrin to their death.  How the Daily Telegraph reported Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon in 1969



10/23/2018 - 12:24 PM

 

Australia's Prime Minister Formally Apologized to Child Sex Abuse Victims

Australia's Prime Minister Formally Apologized to Child Sex Abuse VictimsAustralian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the nation must acknowledge child sex abuse victims' long, painful journey



10/22/2018 - 12:53 AM

 

Germany Stops Exporting Arms to Saudi Arabia After Killing of Jamal Khashoggi

Germany Stops Exporting Arms to Saudi Arabia After Killing of Jamal KhashoggiGermany announced plans to stop exporting arms to Saudi Arabia in the wake of the killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi



10/22/2018 - 06:16 AM

 

Monsanto weed killer ruling is 1st step in long legal battle

Monsanto weed killer ruling is 1st step in long legal battleSAN FRANCISCO (AP) — With its stock dropping and more lawsuits expected, Monsanto vowed Tuesday to press on with a nationwide legal defense of its best-selling weed killer Roundup after a San Francisco judge upheld a verdict alleging it causes cancer.



10/23/2018 - 07:36 PM

 

White House presses forward with Trump's Space Command

White House presses forward with Trump's Space CommandU.S. President Donald Trump's planned U.S. Space Command should seek to develop ways for the country's military to operate in outer space, White House advisers recommended on Tuesday, with the government hoping to secure approval for it by 2020. The National Space Council, a White House advisory panel, recommended a review of existing legal issues for military space operations and unveiled proposed legislation for Congress to create and fund a separate space agency to oversee commercial activities. The council's recommendations were made at a meeting on Tuesday at the National Defense University in Washington.



10/23/2018 - 05:51 PM

 

Giant mice threaten rare seabirds on remote British island

Giant mice threaten rare seabirds on remote British islandMice brought to a remote South Atlantic island by sailors in the 19th century are threatening seabirds including the critically endangered Tristan albatross, a British charity said on Monday. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds said the rodents have proliferated on uninhabited Gough Island, part of a British overseas territory, and are killing two million birds every year. "We knew there were large numbers of chicks and eggs being beaten each year but the actual number being taken by the mice is just staggering," Alex Bond, a researcher from the Natural History Museum in London, said in a statement released by the RSPB.



10/22/2018 - 01:24 PM

 

'Everybody Has to Do More.' How Chef José Andrés Is Serving Millions of People Displaced By Hurricanes

'Everybody Has to Do More.' How Chef José Andrés Is Serving Millions of People Displaced By HurricanesJose Andres discussed what needs to happen next to end hunger throughout the world in a TIME 100 x WeWork Speaker series event.



10/23/2018 - 02:51 PM

 

Archaeologists discover a 2,400-year-old shipwreck, perfectly preserved

Archaeologists discover a 2,400-year-old shipwreck, perfectly preservedArchaeologists are patient professionals, slowly piecing together bits of the past with mysterious scraps, the stubborn detritus of days gone by—bits of pottery, old bones, a partial message etched in stone. Sometimes, however, they get very lucky and make a discovery of a relic that’s intact and can rewrite history, or at least reveal it…



10/23/2018 - 11:38 AM

 

AP Exclusive: Stephen Hawking's wheelchair, thesis for sale

AP Exclusive: Stephen Hawking's wheelchair, thesis for saleLONDON (AP) — Stephen Hawking was a cosmic visionary, a figure of inspiration and a global celebrity.



10/22/2018 - 03:04 AM

 

New Study Reveals Chocolate Labs Have Shorter Lifespan Than Their Yellow and Black Counterparts

New Study Reveals Chocolate Labs Have Shorter Lifespan Than Their Yellow and Black CounterpartsStudy Says Chocolate Labs Have Shorter Lifespans Than Other Labs



10/22/2018 - 05:25 PM

 

A North Carolina Police Officer Fatally Shot a Black Motorist During a Traffic Stop

A North Carolina Police Officer Fatally Shot a Black Motorist During a Traffic StopA white North Carolina police officer shot and killed a black motorist who stepped out of his vehicle with a gun



10/22/2018 - 10:16 PM

 

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin Quietly Met With the Saudi Crown Prince in Wake of Khashoggi's Killing

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin Quietly Met With the Saudi Crown Prince in Wake of Khashoggi's KillingThe treasury secretary quietly met with Saudi Arabia’s crown prince amid international outcry over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi



10/23/2018 - 06:02 AM

 

This perfectly rectangular iceberg would like to object to your ideas of natural geometry

This perfectly rectangular iceberg would like to object to your ideas of natural geometryAt some point someone said, “there are no right angles in nature,” and then everyone believed that person. Precise right angles might be hard to come by, but approximate right angles are everywhere. Salt crystals are cubic in nature. Many trees form approximate right angles with the ground. And recently NASA found an Antarctic iceberg…



10/22/2018 - 12:04 PM

 

'I'm Protecting Everybody,' President Trump Says After Reports His Administration Wants to Strip Transgender Protections

'I'm Protecting Everybody,' President Trump Says After Reports His Administration Wants to Strip Transgender ProtectionsPresident Donald Trump addressed reports his administration planned to strip transgender people of protections by adopting a new gender definition.



10/22/2018 - 05:57 PM

 

UN climate chief calls for action plan at COP24 summit

UN climate chief calls for action plan at COP24 summitKraków (Poland) (AFP) - The UN's climate chief on Tuesday said the COP24 summit in Poland must produce a detailed programme to move the Paris climate accord forward. World leaders have been trying to breathe new life into the Paris Agreement amid backsliding from several nations over commitments made when it was signed in December 2015. "Success at COP24 means finalising the Paris Agreement Work Programme -- period," said Patricia Espinosa, executive secretary of UN Climate Change.



10/23/2018 - 10:56 AM

 

Study shows equality frees women to follow traditional gender choices – or does it?

Study shows equality frees women to follow traditional gender choices – or does it?Gender differences in jobs and attitudes are wider in countries with more equality, but that's not the end of the story.



10/23/2018 - 08:48 AM

 

Brexit Raises Concern U.K. Will Lose Key Scientists, Funds

Brexit Raises Concern U.K. Will Lose Key Scientists, FundsResearchers in Britain worry that a sharp break in ties with the European Union or failure to work out a deal could lead to an exodus of highly skilled specialists, curtail funding and hinder collaboration. The concerns extend beyond the U.K. with scientists warning that Brexit could hurt Europe after decades of gains fueled by the flow of ideas and people across borders. In a survey of more than 1,000 staff members at the Francis Crick Institute, the U.K.’s biggest biomedical research lab, 97 percent of scientists said that a “hard Brexit” would have an adverse impact on U.K. science.



10/23/2018 - 05:49 AM

 

Japanese Nobel chemistry laureate Shimomura dies at 90

Japanese Nobel chemistry laureate Shimomura dies at 90TOKYO (AP) — Japanese-born Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has died. He was 90.



10/22/2018 - 01:53 AM

 

'Dinosaur country': fossil hunters' S. African paradise

'Dinosaur country': fossil hunters' S. African paradiseThe sun rises over the South African bush as scientists laden with backpacks climb a hillside. Jonah Choiniere and his team from Johannesburg's Witwatersrand University had tracked the reptile from another age for three years. The search brought them to a stretch of farmland in the central town of Rosendal, where they are surrounded by cattle and impalas.



10/23/2018 - 06:05 AM

 

Researchers Have Found Microplastics in Human Waste for the First Time

Researchers Have Found Microplastics in Human Waste for the First TimeMicroplastic particles have been discovered in human waste for the first time ever, according to the Guardian.



10/23/2018 - 01:36 PM

 

French Teenager Who Threatened His Teacher With a Fake Gun Was Charged

French Teenager Who Threatened His Teacher With a Fake Gun Was ChargedPresident Emmanuel Macron said threatening a teacher was "unacceptable"



10/22/2018 - 04:58 AM

 

Prince Harry Wants Meghan Markle to Have a Baby Girl and People Couldn't Be More Excited

Prince Harry Wants Meghan Markle to Have a Baby Girl and People Couldn't Be More ExcitedThe Duke and Duchess of Sussex are expecting their first child together



10/22/2018 - 10:48 AM

 

Has Trump Met the Burden of Proof for Ripping Up an Arms Deal With Russia?

Has Trump Met the Burden of Proof for Ripping Up an Arms Deal With Russia?Citing classified intelligence, President Donald Trump revealed the intention to withdraw from an arms control treaty with Russia.



10/22/2018 - 10:16 PM

 

Plastics have entered human food chain, study shows

Plastics have entered human food chain, study showsBits of plastic have been detected in the faeces of people in Europe, Russia and Japan, according to research claiming to show for the first time the widespread presence of plastics in the human food chain. All eight volunteers in a small pilot study were found to have passed several types of plastic, with an average of 20 micro-particles per 10 grams of stool, researchers reported Tuesday at a gastroenterology congress in Vienna. The scientists speculated that the tiny specks -- ranging in size from 50 to 500 micrometres -- may been ingested via seafood, food wrapping, dust or plastic bottles.



10/23/2018 - 10:06 AM

 

Scientists used AI to explore the results of the Implicit Association Test

Scientists used AI to explore the results of the Implicit Association TestArtificial intelligence may not be human, but that doesn’t make it exempt from the kind of bias almost every person displays. That’s because we’ve been building prejudice into our AI, which learns both the good and the bad from human creators. It’s a problem, scientists say, with a hidden benefit: By trying to understand how…



10/23/2018 - 08:00 AM

 

You Can't Have it All! Male Birds Are Either Good Singers or Very Attractive New Study Reveals

You Can't Have it All! Male Birds Are Either Good Singers or Very Attractive New Study RevealsStudy Shows Male Birds are Either Good Singers or Very Attractive



10/23/2018 - 01:33 AM

 

UNAM launches electronic catalog of academic services

UNAM launches electronic catalog of academic servicesMexico, Oct. 22 (Notimex).- The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM, for its acronym in Spanish) has launched an electronic platform to promote and publicize its products and services in the academic world. In this platform, interested parties can contract a service or consult a project of researchers from more than 70 entities of the university, as well as search by keyword or through different sections. Clara Lopez Guzman, Director of Special Projects of the Coordination of Innovation and Development, explained that it is COGNOS-UNAM www.cognos.unam.mx, an electronic catalog with access to developments developed in the maximum house of studies. That is, technical and clinical services, as well as training, and adds laboratories, technologies and publications that may be susceptible to transfer, especially patents and software, which contribute to the country's development. "Through a simple search engine, those interested in hiring a service or consult some knowledge of our researchers and their projects, can do a search by keyword or through different sections," she said. COGNOS exists since 2015, but had worked only internally. Now, within the framework of the first decade of the existence of the Coordination of Innovation and Development (CID, for its acronym in Spanish), this platform opens up to the productive, public, private and social sectors. Starting this month, the CID begins its relationship with industry chambers and industries so that they know about it. The system puts the user in contact with a linker, who will attend directly, and then personalized, the initial request that was made online. This network has periodic meetings, workshops and courses where they receive training to meet a profile that allows them to sign agreements, provide services and make economic proposals and advice on how to charge and bid. Lopez Guzman indicated that the linkers have the task of putting in contact and encouraging, where appropriate, new lines of research, and perhaps the creation of a patent, and a company with that patent. "That would be a great success story, where COGNOS would be the seed," she concluded. NTX/ERM/DAP/BBF



10/22/2018 - 02:09 PM

 

Japan firms fined $3.4 million over maglev bid-rigging

Japan firms fined $3.4 million over maglev bid-riggingTwo major construction companies were Monday ordered to pay fines totalling more than $3 million for colluding to win contracts on Japan's multi-billion-dollar maglev project. The state-of-the-art maglev -- magnetic levitation -- trains are scheduled to begin commercial service between Tokyo and Nagoya in central Japan in 2027, later extending to the western hub of Osaka. The Japan Fair Trade Commission brought charges against four companies in March for suspected anti-trust violations, accusing them of sharing estimated costs for construction work.



10/22/2018 - 04:16 AM

 

Museum of the Bible Says 5 Dead Sea Scroll Fragments Are Fake

Museum of the Bible Says 5 Dead Sea Scroll Fragments Are FakeTesting found that five fragments are "inconsistent with ancient origin"



10/22/2018 - 08:20 PM

 

AbbVie rheumatoid arthritis drug succeeds in late stage trial

AbbVie rheumatoid arthritis drug succeeds in late stage trialAbbVie Inc on Tuesday said its experimental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment showed significant improvement in physical function, pain and quality of life compared with the commonly prescribed generic drug methotrexate in a late stage clinical trial. The U.S. drugmaker hopes the drug, upadacitinib, can help replace lost revenue from its top-selling RA treatment Humira when it starts to face biosimilar competition in the United States in 2023. AbbVie said it will file applications this years seeking regulatory approval for the medicine.



10/23/2018 - 10:16 AM

 

Taiwan's President Calls for Investigation After the Worst Train Crash in Decades

Taiwan's President Calls for Investigation After the Worst Train Crash in DecadesTaiwan's president pressed for a quick, transparent probe into the cause of the island's worst train crash in nearly three decades



10/22/2018 - 05:11 AM

 

President Trump's Midterm Arguments: Mobs, Immigration and the Economy

President Trump's Midterm Arguments: Mobs, Immigration and the EconomyPresident Donald Trump laid out his version of the choice in the midterm elections: "Republicans produce jobs, Democrats produce mobs"



10/22/2018 - 09:59 PM

 

From 'problem child' to 'prodigy'? LSD turns 75

From 'problem child' to 'prodigy'? LSD turns 75Lysergic acid diethylamide was labelled a "problem child" by the man who discovered its hallucinogenic properties in 1943: as it turns 75, the drug known as LSD may now be changing its image. The late Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann famously learned of LSD's psychedelic effects when he inadvertently took a small dose while doing lab work for pharmaceutical company Sandoz. The book, in which Hofmann sought to reassert LSD's potential medical benefits, is featured in an exhibition at the Swiss National Library in the capital, Bern, to mark 75 years since the discovery.



10/22/2018 - 09:45 AM

 

Lebanese seek to save landmark concrete park from crumbling

Lebanese seek to save landmark concrete park from crumblingClose to the seafront in Lebanon's Tripoli, giant curves of concrete stand testimony to dreams before the civil war, etchings of an exhibition park never finished but already cracking. This month, a rare exhibition is being held at the site designed by legendary Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer in a desperate call to save it from ruin. Inside the vast grey grounds of the Tripoli International Fair in northern Lebanon, a palm tree throws its dark silhouette onto a giant concrete dome.



10/22/2018 - 06:04 AM

 

Turkey's Erdogan Says Saudi Arabian Officials Planned Jamal Khashoggi's Murder Days Before His Death

Turkey's Erdogan Says Saudi Arabian Officials Planned Jamal Khashoggi's Murder Days Before His DeathTurkey’s president has urged Saudi Arabia to reveal who ordered the “savage murder” of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the kingdom’s consulate in Istanbul, and said the 18 Saudis suspected of carrying it out should be tried in Turkish courts.



10/23/2018 - 09:10 AM

 

'Headless chicken monster' caught on camera off East Antarctica

'Headless chicken monster' caught on camera off East AntarcticaIn the deep, dark Southern Ocean encircling Antarctica lies a creature so bewildering and elusive, it hasn't been filmed for a year.  Behold, the 'headless chicken monster,' which has been filmed casually swimming near East Antarctica, the first time it's been filmed in the region.  Except that it's not headless, a chicken, or a monster. It's a sea cucumber. SEE ALSO: So, turns out snakes have been hitchhiking on planes. Have a nice flight. Deep-sea resident Enypniastes eximia, also known as the 'headless chicken monster' to undeniably hilarious scientists, has been filmed in the Southern Ocean. Researchers caught the unusual species of swimming sea cucumber with a new underwater camera system, which has been developed by the Australian Antarctic Division, part of Australia’s Department of the Environment and Energy, for monitoring commercial long-line fishing. It's the first time the bright pink creature has been filmed in the Southern Ocean, as it has only ever been caught on camera around the Gulf of Mexico, according to the AAD. According to a 1990 study published in Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences, the sea cucumber ranges from 6 to 25 cm (2.3 to 9.8 inches) in length and "swims almost continuously, briefly settling to the seafloor to ingest surface sediments."  It uses tiny little tentacles to rapidly grasp this sediment from the seafloor to eat, and propels its bulbous, translucent body forward using a webbed veil. If you're truly perplexed, here's another look at the creature, filmed by the Okeanos Explorer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in 2017 in the Gulf of Mexico — the last time the sea cucumber was filmed.  Some of this footage appears in the new AAD video for context, if some clips look familiar (they're the frames that read "file vision" in the above video). So, how did they film it this time around? The deep-sea cameras that luckily caught this perplexing creature are recording important data for commercial fishing and marine conservation, all of which is sent to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), the international body in charge of managing the Southern Ocean. They're thrown into the water attached to fishing gear, and can reach depths of up to three kilometres (1.86 miles). So, you'd be right to assume they'd need to be pretty durable.  Two of the underwater cameras developed to enhance the sustainability of long line fishing in the Southern Ocean.Image: Jessica Fitzpatrick/AAD"We needed something that could be thrown from the side of a boat, and would continue operating reliably under extreme pressure in the pitch black for long periods of time," Australian Antarctic Division program leader Dirk Welsford, said in a statement.  "Some of the footage we are getting back from the cameras is breathtaking, including species we have never seen in this part of the world." According to Welsford, other nations such as Chile, France, and the United Kingdom are now also using the durable cameras to survey and monitor the impact of commercial fishing on marine environments. "Most importantly, the cameras are providing important information about areas of sea floor that can withstand this type of fishing, and sensitive areas that should be avoided," he said. "It’s a really simple and practical solution which is directly contributing to improving sustainable fishing practices." Why is this footage important? The data collected from the cameras will be presented at CCAMLR's 10-day annual meeting in Hobart, Tasmania beginning Oct. 22.  With this data and examples of unique marine life like the sea cucumber in hand, Australia’s CCAMLR Commissioner, Gillian Slocum, said Australia will be seeking support for the creation of a new East Antarctic Marine Protected Area at the meeting, as well as supporting two other new Marine Protected Areas in the Southern Ocean. "The Southern Ocean is home to an incredible abundance and variety of marine life, including commercially sought-after species, the harvesting of which must be carefully managed for future generations," Slocum added. At least some humans have got your bright pink back, little sea cucumbers. WATCH: There’s an underwater pokéball that helps us study delicate sea creatures without harming them



10/21/2018 - 09:59 PM

 

NASA’s incredible water system dumps 450,000 gallons in about a minute

NASA’s incredible water system dumps 450,000 gallons in about a minute

Once a rocket leaves the launch pad, all eyes turn skyward, but the technology that keeps launch sites working at their peak efficiency is pretty darn interesting in its own right. In a new video posted to YouTube, NASA shows off its insanely powerful water system that will keep things cool during the upcoming launches of the Boeing-built Space Launch System.

What you're seeing is roughly 450,000 gallons of water being pumped out in about a minute. It's called the Ignition Overpressure Protection and Sound Suppression system, and NASA uses it to keep the launch pad at a manageable temperature even as its being blasted by a rocket.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNkmwrTjKuo

As NASA notes in the video's description, the test was performed at Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center. The water was pushed around 100 feet in the air before spilling back into a large trench where it travels back to holding ponds.

In this case, the water spewed upward because the rest of the hardware isn't fully connected yet. When the launcher is in place, the water will actually flow through a network of pipes and nozzles rather than spewing out like a geyser. Along with helping to dissipate the heat generated during the rocket firing, the water also helps absorb some of the intense noise that the rocket will generate.

NASA says that this latest test is yet another big step towards the eventual launch of the Space Launch System on its first major test, Exploration Mission-1, which is expected to take place sometime around mid-2020. That's still a long way off, but getting into space takes time, especially when a new launch vehicle is part of the deal.



10/22/2018 - 06:04 PM

 

Apple Is Finally Fixing That 'Skin-Smoothing Selfie' Problem With the New iPhones

Apple Is Finally Fixing That 'Skin-Smoothing Selfie' Problem With the New iPhonesSome iPhone users called it "Beautygate"



10/23/2018 - 09:17 AM

 

Why You Should Stop Closing Your Blinds During the Day

Why You Should Stop Closing Your Blinds During the DayThe health benefits of letting sunshine into your home probably outweigh any privacy risk.



10/23/2018 - 01:30 PM

 

Congolese Rebels Stage Deadly Attack Stalling Ebola Containment Efforts

Congolese Rebels Stage Deadly Attack Stalling Ebola Containment EffortsCongolese rebels killed 15 civilians and abducted a dozen children in an attack at the epicenter of the latest deadly Ebola outbreak



10/22/2018 - 02:19 AM

 

Celebrities Slam Megyn Kelly for Saying She Doesn't Understand Why Blackface Halloween Costumes Are Offensive

Celebrities Slam Megyn Kelly for Saying She Doesn't Understand Why Blackface Halloween Costumes Are Offensive"What is racist?"



10/23/2018 - 03:54 PM

 

Trump's 'Space Force' to be built in stages by 2020

Trump's 'Space Force' to be built in stages by 2020A new US "Space Force" will soon take shape but will at least initially be a step below the proposed sixth branch of the military envisioned by President Donald Trump, his vice president said Tuesday. The White House does not foresee the creation of an independent space force before 2020, said US Vice President Mike Pence, who heads the National Space Council, a government body that was revived last year after a decades-long hiatus. Pence said the president will soon ask Congress to gather military and civilians working on space security into a unified command, similar to the military's special forces.



10/23/2018 - 02:24 PM

 

 

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